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Monthly Archives: June 2016

Open Boarder, Open Hearts – A Preacher’s Position on the Refugee Resolution

The Confederate Flag resolution has been the dominating take away from the Southern Baptist’s 2016 Annual Meeting in St. Louis, but there was another amazing resolution I hope does not get covered up by a flag.  This resolution was titled “On Refugee Ministry.”  Opening our nation to accept refugees has been a passion of mine for some time.  I have written twice on the support of accepting refugees.  One was our responsibility in Syria since we are directly involved in the conflict, and the second, was in praise of our government’s job of vetting refugees and our continued responsibility to minister to others.  I was overjoyed to learn that my denomination stood tall on this issue and cried with one voice to open our boarders, our churches, our homes, and our hearts to minister to the displaced in this world through war and tradgedy.

Again, this is an extradinary stand by denomination that I am still trying to process.  To help you to undestand my surprise, I must share that many, if not most of the resolutions, passed at the Southern Baptist Annual Meeting and the Goergia Mission Board Annual Meeting are boring.  We pass resolutions like, “Drugs are bad,” “Parents should be involved in children’s education and educate them in a Christian manner,” or “We should tell people about Jesus.”  The resolutions are often so obvious, avoiding controversy, that their passing is barely a blip on the schedule.  That is NOT so in 2016.

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Oh, My Stars and Bars and Garters – A Preacher’s Position on the Confederate Flag Resolution

I will always remember where I was and what I felt on June 14th, 2016 as I learned the denomination in which I pastor, the Southern Baptist Convention, voted overwhelmingly to repudiate the Confederate Battle Flag and to call all Southern Baptist to cease displaying this flag. A incredible mixture of shock and gratefulness and amazement and sheer determination swirled and is still swirling inside of me. I was glad to see this resolution being passed made national news, but let me tell you, unless you are a Southern Baptist, you will have a hard time grasping what this step means.

First, it reveals our unwavering commitment to the gospel of Jesus Christ. As stated at our 2016 Annual Meeting, where this resolution was passed, the Confederate Battle Flag is viewed as a symbol of racism and worse, to African Americas, many other ethnicities, including whites, and by wide geography of peoples. Since this flag has such negative connotations to these people, we must remove it, so we can build relationships with these groups and share the gospel of Jesus Christ without hindrance. This vote proves that the Gospel going forth is vastly more important that so many of our Southern Baptist member’s and pastor’s heritage in the past.

Second, it shows that “they” have a priority over “us.” We told ourselves, we don’t care what that flag means or symbolizes to some of us. What matter is what it means to them because again we are trying to impact them. So get over yourself, take the flag down, and reach others with the gospel unhindered by a symbol that closes so many ears.

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My Gun Control Conversion – A Preacher’s Position on the Orlando Mass Shooting

The massacre in Orlando at the gay nightclub over the weekend has left me, like so many, on an emotional roller coaster. I am heart broken one second and enraged the next. It has taken me some time to gather myself on even where to begin to discuss this situation. There is so much to say. First, I want to say how proud I am of my church, Sunnyside Baptist Church in Toccoa Georgia.

Entering church on Sunday, I was unaware of the shooting. It happened after I was asleep on Saturday, and getting the family ready for church, we did not turn on the tv on Sunday. In our morning worship service, we have a time where people can share prayer concerns, and we had a church member announce we needed to pray for the victims in Orlando. I pastor a theologically conservative church believing that homosexuality is against God’s word, but last Sunday, we knelt together to pray and lift up the LGBT community in Orlando and the loved ones affected by this horrific shooting. Disagreeing on moral issues does not have to equal hatred or bigotry. It doesn’t at Sunnyside and most other churches. I was proud to see my church show compassion and love to those in need, regardless of lifestyle.

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